"The best way to go into an unknown territory is to go in ignorant, ignorant as possible, with your mind wide open, as wide open as possible and not having to meet anyone else's requirement but your own."

- Dorothee Lange

What Does Acupuncture Feel Like?

Many first-time patients are concerned that acupuncture needles will feel like the needles used in tattooing or drawing blood at the doctor’s office. They won't, they can't; they are SO much smaller.  Acupuncture uses hair-thin, flexible needles that you may not even feel when inserted. Following insertion, patients often describe a heavy, achy pressure, or spreading, traveling feeling, but there is no "normal", everyone responds differently.  You may also feel an "electrical" sensation moving down the meridian pathways or an increase in pressure or pulsating at certain points; all of these sensations are the feeling of energy moving.  You will tend to experience more noticeable sensations around the areas that have more stagnation and therefore require more movement of energy to flow through them, to unblock them.  It can be an incredible feeling, that most patients, find deeply relaxing; both mentally and physically.

Acupuncture treatment creates deep relaxation
in both mind and body.

How Many Treatments Will I Need?

The benefits of acupuncture are cumulative, so more then one treatment is necessary. There are various factors/ energetic imbalances, that cause a condition, some are more easily treated than others. It is possible that an acute condition may be treated in as little as one session, whereas a chronic condition may take 5-12 treatments. As a rule of thumb, estimate four treatments for every year that you had the condition. There really is no cut and dry answer to this question because everyone responds differently to treatment, and YOU are the most important factor that will determine how effective your treatment will be over the long run.  Simple things like drinking plenty of water, getting enough rest, and following aftercare advice, can make all the difference.

Acupuncture is Best as Preventative Medicine

Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine are at their best when used as preventative medicine.  The needles are simply a tool to manipulate your body's energy, to keep it flowing freely.  Every headache, muscle cramp, fit of anger, twitching muscle, sleepless night, sore throat, etc ...; they are all just symptoms of stagnated energy.  The more stagnated your energy, the more severe the symptom.  It's actually very simple, but because we tend to ignore our health issues when they are minor, we allow them to become more problematic and more deeply embedded into our body's tissues.  For example, acute conditions are more easily treated because they are in the more superficial layers of your body, easier to "push out".  When you ignore something for long enough, or it isn't treated effectively, it is able to settle deeper and deeper into your muscles, tissues and even into your memory.  Your body can get so used to being in pain that your brain can get stuck in a negative feedback loop, creating pain if when none exists.  The effects of acupuncture can be felt throughout your entire body, but the effects on your brain are what can create a more lasting result from your treatments. Acupuncture induces the release of endorphins, serotonin and other neurotransmitters in the brain, a/k/a your body's natural pain relieving and feel good chemicals;  they put your body in the ideal state to be receptive to treatment.  

It really doesn't matter what your current state of health may be, you will benefit from acupuncture.

Preventative treatments and treatments for general well-being may be scheduled on an as-needed basis. 

 

What to Expect - Pura Vida Acupuncture and Yoga in Portland, Maine

"Music puts wings on the human spirit."                      - Frank Sinatra

I have been in love with music for as long as I can remember.  It brings me great joy, that through and acupuncture and yoga; I am able to utilize my love of music as a way to connect with my patients and students. 

Music is incredible in it's ability to awaken the senses, inspire the soul and quiet the mind.  It's a common opinion that music is distracting in a yoga practice, and while I  appreciate and understand the value of silence; I also find music to be incredibly therapeutic.  The problem I find, is that silence, in a yoga practice, can be incredibly loud.  In the vast space that silence creates, our minds wander wildly, leaving very few moments to be spent in the present.  Music holds your attention, which allows for a cerebral experience of the present moment; one that has the ability to affect real and lasting change.  It is this kind of experience that ultimately leads to healing of physical, mental and emotional dis-ease. The immense capacity of our minds is a blessing and a curse.  They hold so much about the past and the future, distracting us away from the moment that truly matters.

Our senses connect us to the outside world, and when combined with a practice of mindfulness, they provide a bridge between our mind and physical body. Understanding how the stimuli of the world around us affects shifts in the energy within us, is a powerful way to learn about ourselves. That kind of understanding is the only way to truly be able to take control of your health ... your life.

Music, unique in it's ability to create a cathartic release, can bring about a shift in emotional energy unlike any yoga class or acupuncture needle.  The ability to let go, to emote, to be vulnerable, to release the emotions you have been holding onto; is essential to the ability to heal physically. Both acupuncture and a yoga work to unblock stuck energy. Music can encourage the physical purging of the energy that is released. Holding onto emotional pain will  keep you sick, and releasing it assists in your ability to heal. It all comes back to energy.  Where it is stuck, we need to move it, and what doesn't serve you, needs to be released. We are energy, music is energy.  I believe that music is medicine.

© 2017 Kristen Boze, Puravidaacupunctureandyoga.com